Polar wearabletech wristband is driving me Loop-y

One of the factors that will make or break the mass-market success of wearabletech is the user experience (UX), as Apple ably demonstrated with the iPad when revolutionizing the home computing market.

And as wearable technology gifts appear under the Christmas tree this year, my advice to the vendors is simple: Make sure your tech support is fully staffed over the holiday season.

That’s because even “simple” stuff like pairing a smart wristband with a smartphone can sometimes become a Herculean task – as I’ve discovered with the Polar Loop: It Will. Not. Sync. With. iPhone.

May as well wait forever

Waiting for sync on the Polar Loop? May as well wait forever with an iPhone 4.

This is despite rebooting everything, checking the device isn’t in flight mode, and going back to review the instructions (RTFM) one more time. It’s been one of those moments that are so frustrating, I wanted to fling the Loop across the room.

It’s only after digging a bit deeper that it becomes clear that I might as well wait for Godot – because the Polar app doesn’t work with the humble iPhone 4: although it is still possible to download and run Flow on a 4 (Polar’s bad), the phone doesn’t have low-power Bluetooth.

By the time I discovered this, I’d already emailed Polar support – others will do likewise, or call. And since handling inquiries costs the vendor money, my recommendation is to focus on usability upfront. And hurry up with that Android app, while you’re at it!

/WTW

5 Responses to Polar wearabletech wristband is driving me Loop-y

  1. Excellent reminder that whatever we launch must WORK and be supported. Show the love.

  2. […] their pulse, since the Gear Fit has a heart-rate sensor, which is still a rarity on an armband. The Polar Loop works with a chest-worn heart-rate sensor, but this is sold […]

  3. […] Polar wearabletech wristband is driving me Loop-y […]

  4. […] In terms of appearance, the ERI looks almost identical to the ill-fated Fitbit Force, except it avoids the use of nickel for the clasp. The tracker is screwed to the silicon band, similar to the Polar Loop. […]

  5. […] In terms of appearance, the ERI looks almost identical to the ill-fated Fitbit Force, except it avoids the use of nickel for the clasp. The tracker is screwed to the silicon band, similar to the Polar Loop. […]

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